#Florida Fiction – Celebrate #Earth Day 2014

DSC03075Florida–surrounded on both sides by water–is vulnerable to the changes inherent in the world today. Sea level rises, beach erosion, and increased intensity of hurricanes leave the state open to natural disasters. Add to that the unmitigated sprawl of developers to the Sunshine State for its landscape and warm weather, and all the elements for disaster are in place.

I made Florida my home for thirty years. I hope to return there in a few years. The state is in my blood, which means I’ll be writing about the characters and environment for a long time. I’m working on the first draft of my third book of Florida Environmental Fiction, while my first two books, Trails in the Sand and Tortoise Stew, are available to read at any time.

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Trails in the Sand –

***Love Triangles, Endangered Sea Turtles, and BP’s Oil Spill

***A Florida Novel by award-winning Florida author, P.C. Zick

When environmental writer Caroline Carlisle sets off to report on endangered sea turtles during the BP’s oil spill, the last thing she expects is to uncover secrets – secrets that threaten to destroy her family, unless she can heal the hurts from a lifetime of lies. To make matters worse, Caroline’s love for her late sister’s husband, Simon, creates an uproar in a southern family already set on a collision course with its past.

From Caroline’s sister: “My sister is nothing more than a common whore,” Amy said when Simon told her he was leaving her. “You just have to face it and get over some childhood notion about her being your soul mate.”

On BP’s oil spill: “Two weeks after the Deepwater Horizon explosion, dead sea turtles began washing up on the beaches near Pass Christian, Mississippi. Beach walkers discovered the stranded animals on sand darkened by the blood seeping from the turtles’ nostrils and underbelly.”

Using BP oil spill timeline and facts as the backdrop, Trails in the Sand explores the fight to restore balance and peace, in nature and in a family, as both spiral toward disaster.

 

TORTpsdTortoise Stew 

Florida Fiction filled with intrigue, corruption, twisted love, and outrageous Florida  characters

A Florida Environmental Novel from Award-winning author, P.C. Zick

Small town politics at its best, worst, and wildest in this novel about the development of Florida at any cost.

“The bomb sat in a bag on Kelly Sands’ desk for an hour before she noticed it.” And so begins the raucous journey through small town Florida politics in Tortoise Stew.

Kelly Sands, a reporter, covers some of the more controversial and contentious issues in a small Florida town. Dead armadillos and gopher tortoise carcasses left as calling cards to those opposing the development of rural Florida show small town politics at its worst.

Commission meetings erupt into all-out warfare. With the murder of one commissioner and the suicide of his wife, Kelly begins an investigation that threatens to topple the carefully laid plans of the developers and politicians to bring a movie studio and landing strip within the city limits of the small town. When a semi-truck from Monster Mart runs over and kills a young girl, the environmentalists become even more vocal against the developers’ plans. All the while, Kelly struggles to overcome and escape her past, which catches up to her as she follows the antics of the politicians, developers, and environmentalists. With the help of her boss, Bart, and her best friend, Molly, she uncovers more than corruption in small town politics.

Writing & Gardening – No Time to Blog

By Patricia Zick @P.C. Zick

I’ve had to let my blog go the past week or so. I’ve reblogged some of my favorite blogs on topics near to my heart, but I haven’t been able to find the time or inspiration to concentrate long enough to put out a thoughtful post.

I’m juggling three projects right now so that’s my excuse. I keep thinking I’ll find a way to put one of them aside. I’m impressed with my colleagues who manage a daily blog and still manage to write books. I’m lucky if I can produce a blog two times a week.

When I published Live from the Road on Kindle, I didn’t realize the amount of promoting I’d need to do to sell the book. Nearly 20,000 folks have now downloaded it. Ninety-seven percent of those downloads were done on free promotional days, which are now over. Next week,  a media blitz will hopefully  draw more folks to actually download it on Kindle for $2.99 or buy the print edition at $7.90 on amazon. I’ve told myself that’s it. I’ve done all I can do at this point. Live from the Road has been sent out into the world. I must move onto my other projects.

I wrote the novel Tortoise Stew ten years ago. It was published with a publisher – whose name I refuse to promote – in 2006. I decided it was time to edit the book and put it out on Kindle as well. That’s occupied half of my time for the past ten days. I hope to have it up on amazon early next week, in time for Live‘s media blitz. All the experts keep hammering the point that indie authors, such as myself, need to have more than one book out. I’ve enjoyed reading Tortoise Stew once again and revisiting the chaos of Florida politics and development and land grab at any cost. The same artist (Travis Pennington) who designed Live‘s cover is currently redesigning the cover for Tortoise Stew – I should have it in a few days.

Finally, I’m working on the second draft of my new novel Trails in the Sand. It’s going well, but I’ve decided to change point of view from one person (first person) to three people plus short narrative chapters on the environmental issues at play in the background.

I find working on the two novels at the same time helpful, which surprises me. I’m pleased the messages in Tortoise Stew are the same ones I believe today and try to incorporate in everything I write. I love the love story in Tortoise Stew. I wrote it imagining the ideal love relationship I yearned for at the time. Guess what? A decade later I’ve found that with my new husband, Robert. It’s uncanny when I read scenes I wrote ten years ago and realize they are now reality.

When I’m not absorbed in my writing world, I tend the produce from our garden. Every night we’re eating mostly fresh vegetables. Last night we had cauliflower and beets. The tomatoes are piling up on the windowsill so next weekend I’m sure I’ll be canning sauce and dreaming  up scenes for Trails in the Sand, while Live from the Road and Tortoise Stew sell themselves on the Internet. Why not? I’ve turned my dreams into reality before.