Building the Garden Beds

 

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Pre-Samuel

We began by hiring Samuel to bring his excavator out to the cabin to prepare the site for a garden. Tree stumps stood in Robert’s way to turning the soft clay soil. Samuel had no problem ripping them out of the ground and dumping over the other side of our small mountain (folks here call these hills or foothills).

 

We heard him before we saw him. He decided to unload his machinery down at the bottom of the hill and drive it up to the cabin. And then he got right down to work.DSC03568

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After three hours, Samuel finished the job, leaving the rest to Robert and another great guy, Peter, to start building the beds.

 

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Cutting the boards for the sides of the beds

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The inside of the boards were lined with plastic to protect the wood. Robert decided not to use pressure treated lumber even if it means replacing these boards in a few years. When that time comes, we hope to find a local supplier of boards made from recycled materials.

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Making the soil: Layers of mostly decomposed bark, mushroom manure, top soil, more bark, more manure.

 

 

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Raking in more bark, a sprinkling of lime, and another layer of top soil. 

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Robert stained the wood to make it blend in with the surroundings.

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The side going down the hill.

 

Originally, we planned to build two beds – one beneath this one. But then we decided that the lower bed would actually be two or three smaller boxes to be built later in the spring. One thing that has been difficult is finding good top soil. We finally found someone who will be delivering a load this week, and that will finish off this first bed.

Robert wants the soil to rest for a few days before he begins planting the seedlings, although he’s going to hold off on the tomato plants for a few weeks.DSC03589DSC03587

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And my little herb garden – the two larger plants (rosemary and oregano) were purchased. The little babies were started by Robert from seed. The planters will be right outside on the deck so I can easily grab them during meal prep

I think this will be an excellent garden. I will keep you posted on the progress.

Robert’s retirement brings him to a place where he can pursue his passion for growing food full time. Next challenge for him will be to create a garden in our Florida home. He’s in for a huge learning curve as all of his gardening – since he was old enough to hold a shovel – has been in the north. Lots to learn in the coming months, but also food to eat and stories to tell.

 

From Seed to Table presents lots of gardening tips and recipes for meals and also for preserving the food from the garden. I wrote this book based on a northern garden. I guess it’s time to start creating another volume for gardening in the Smoky Mountains! Still, I think you’ll find lots of good tips no matter where you live.

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Click on cover for $.99 cents Kindle version

Garden Gone Wild

June 8, 2013

June 8, 2013

By Patricia Zick @PCZick

We may have started the garden late this year, but somehow the cold April mixed with a few hot days and then spurts of rain in May created a monster garden in June. A friend visited in the last days of May, and we’d sit on the balcony overlooking the garden and could swear we saw the peas grow right before us.

peas are a poppin'

peas are a poppin’

Raspberries are growing and flowering, too. Even the late-term raspberry plants have flowers on them. Soon I’ll be hunting down jam and jelly recipes.

raspberry in the making

raspberry in the making

And the best news of all – I spied these tomatoes growing in peace under the broad green leaves of the plant.

sneak peek at coming attractions

sneak peek at coming attractions

We didn’t do anything differently, but somehow the weather – as unpredictable as it’s been this year – did some type of miracle work in the garden.

Here’s an excerpt from From Seed to Table with my husband’s secret for preparing the soil.

Soil Preparation

We don’t test our soil. Robert knows instinctively what the dirt needs when he begins working in the garden, and it’s a function of the moisture in the ground. When the soil dries out, it’s time to start working the beds for the plants ready to go into the garden. He starts planting from mid-March most years.

We’ve been gardening in the same spot for four seasons, so the soil is well conditioned. Robert might not use the rotor tiller this year. It’s not good to break up the soil too much, so now that the soil is in good condition, he hopes he can use a shovel and pickaxe to turn over and break up the soil.

Before he turns the soil, he’ll use a well-rounded organic fertilizer mix of nitrogen, potassium (also known as potash), and phosphorus. It’s important to amend the soil with these organics because it’s essential to the growth of plants and is usually not in sufficient quantities in most soils. As he’s making the beds, he sprinkles the organic fertilizers, dolomitic limestone, green sand, and pulverized phosphate rock. The mix of these organic and inorganic additions forms a dusty layer on top of the bed. He blends it all in with a pick approximately eight inches deep.

Usually every other year, he applies mushroom manure and sand. He gauges this application by how “friable” the soil is. He can tell it’s friable and ready for the root growth of plants, if he clumps it in his palm and the soil falls apart. That means the soil is loose enough without applying the manure or sand. Also, be careful about putting the mushroom manure on seedlings such as peas. Our peas didn’t grow through this top dressing so well last year, and Robert believes manure may not have composted enough, so it burned the seedlings. If the manure is worked into the soil deep enough, this would not have been a problem.cover - lst draftFrom Seed to Table is available on Amazon Kindle for $2.99. On June 13 and 14, you can download the book for FREE.

From Seed to Table

cover - lst draftBy Patricia Zick @PCZick

From Seed to Table  – A Personal Guide to Growing, Harvesting, Cooking, and Preserving Food is now available on Kindle through Amazon. I’m still trying to decide if I’ll do a hard copy of the book – I use lots of photos with the information. Here’s an excerpt on preparing the soil.

Soil Preparation

We don’t test our soil. Robert knows instinctively what the dirt needs when he begins working in the garden, and it’s a function of the moisture in the ground. When the soil dries out, it’s time to start working the beds for the plants ready to go into the garden. He starts planting from mid-March most years.

We’ve been gardening in the same spot for four seasons, so the soil is well conditioned. Robert might not use the rotor tiller this year. It’s not good to break up the soil too much, so now that the soil is in good condition, he hopes he can use a shovel and pickaxe to turn over and break up the soil.

Before he turns the soil, he’ll use a well-rounded organic fertilizer mix of nitrogen, potassium (also known as potash), and phosphorus. It’s important to amend the soil with these organics because it’s essential to the growth of plants and is usually not in sufficient quantities in most soils. As he’s making the beds, he sprinkles the organic fertilizers, dolomitic limestone, green sand, and pulverized phosphate rock. The mix of these organic and inorganic additions forms a dusty layer on top of the bed. He blends it all in with a pick approximately eight inches deep.

Usually every other year, he applies mushroom manure and sand. He gauges this application by how “friable” the soil is. He can tell it’s friable and ready for the root growth of plants, if he clumps it in his palm and the soil falls apart. That means the soil is loose enough without applying the manure or sand. Also, be careful about putting the mushroom manure on seedlings such as peas. Our peas didn’t grow through this top dressing so well last year, and Robert believes manure may not have composted enough, so it burned the seedlings. If the manure is worked into the soil deep enough, this would not have been a problem.

Note: Our peas are healthy and happy this year. It seems they grow a few inches each time I go out to watch their progress up the chicken wire.

peas and spinach 2013

peas and spinach 2013

Garden Plans and Soil Prep

By Patricia Zick @PCZick

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Most folks are planning and readying the soil for planting. We’ve had things in the ground here in southwestern Pennsylvania for several weeks now. But last night, a frost was predicted so we covered some of the plants. They’re predicting the same for tonight so the sheets will remain in place.

I’m busy readying From Seed to Table for publication. Here’s an excerpt:

Garden Planning

Two words define our garden planning: We don’t. Our garden plans us. It’s not necessarily a haphazard affair, but it isn’t something we draw out on paper before the spring gardening season begins. Robert goes to the garden and begins preparing the soil wherever it seems most likely to put plants. He changes the location for some plants every year. For instance, tomatoes and most plants do better if they aren’t grown in the same dirt every year. It’s late winter as I write this section of the book. He’s placed clear plastic over one raised bed before the rain makes it too wet to work. He plants the first of the onions in this area as soon as the soil is dry enough and the freezes stop. His chosen spot for onions this year is the spot where peppers grew last year. The peppers didn’t produce much during 2012, so here’s hoping the peppers benefit from the change in location. The onions grew in abundance in 2012, and as of April 2013, we’re still eating the onions stored in the basement. I’m hoping the change in location will yield the same results for onions this year.

If you’re a planner and plotter, then the books with a chapter on garden planning will benefit you.

Soil Preparation

We don’t test our soil. Robert knows instinctively what the dirt needs when he begins working in the garden, and it’s a function of the moisture in the ground. When the soil dries out, it’s time to start working the beds for the plants ready to go into the garden. He starts planting from mid-March on in most years.???????????????????????????????

We’ve been gardening in the same spot for four seasons, so the soil is well conditioned. Robert might not use the rotor tiller this year. It’s not good to break up the soil too much, so now that the soil is in good condition, he hopes he can use a shovel and pickaxe to turn over and break up the soil. Before he turns the soil, he’ll use a well-rounded organic fertilizer mix of nitrogen, potassium (also known as potash), and phosphorus. It’s important to amend the soil with these organics because it’s essential to the growth of plants and is usually not in sufficient quantities in most soils. As he’s making the beds, he sprinkles the organic fertilizers, dolomitic limestone, green sand, and pulverized phosphate rock. The mix of these organic and inorganic additions forms a dusty layer on top of the bed. He blends it all in with a pick approximately eight inches deep.

Usually every other year, he applies mushroom manure and sand. He gauges this application by how “friable” the soil is. He can tell it’s friable and ready for the root growth of plants, if he clumps it in his palm and the soil falls apart. That means the soil is loose enough without applying the manure or sand. Also, be careful about putting the mushroom manure on seedlings such as peas. Our peas didn’t grow through this top dressing so well last year, and Robert believes it may not have been composted enough, so it burned the seedlings. If the manure is worked into the soil deep enough, this would not have been a problem.

peas reach for the sky

peas reach for the sky